Sustainability, recycled art and community showcased at the HUB: Free art exhibit through May 20

  • Soleil’s “The Guardian” all silver display with Buddha on a platform with a panther portrays divine guidance from the guardian. (COURTESY PHOTO/KAUAKEA WINSTON)
    Soleil’s “The Guardian” all silver display with Buddha on a platform with a panther portrays divine guidance from the guardian. (COURTESY PHOTO/KAUAKEA WINSTON)
  • The message behind her “Shine on Me” piece is to receive the light of the world, even in the midst of doubt or fear. (COURTESY PHOTO/KAUAKEA WINSTON)
    The message behind her “Shine on Me” piece is to receive the light of the world, even in the midst of doubt or fear. (COURTESY PHOTO/KAUAKEA WINSTON)
  • “Choice” shows a ravaged landscape that can result from negative and positive choices made with clean water, green and pollution. (COURTESY PHOTO/KAUAKEA WINSTON)
    “Choice” shows a ravaged landscape that can result from negative and positive choices made with clean water, green and pollution. (COURTESY PHOTO/KAUAKEA WINSTON)
  • A collage of Soleil’s artwork is displayed on the wall at the HUB. (COURTESY PHOTO/KAUAKEA WINSTON)
    A collage of Soleil’s artwork is displayed on the wall at the HUB. (COURTESY PHOTO/KAUAKEA WINSTON)
  • Artist Alvita Soleil laughs with friends at her show’s opening April 22. (COURTESY PHOTO/KAUAKEA WINSTON)
    Artist Alvita Soleil laughs with friends at her show’s opening April 22. (COURTESY PHOTO/KAUAKEA WINSTON)

HAWI — The Kohala Village HUB celebrated Earth Day April 22 with the opening of a special art exhibit made from recycled and found materials by artist Alvita Soleil.

Inspired by her love of art and concerns for the environment, she decided to create the free show, which continues through May 20.

“Three months ago I really wanted to do something for Earth Day, and because the art was recycled it matched. I did 10 pieces in three months. It just came,” said Soleil. “My materials are simple, and green as it gets. (They are) made from broken pieces of jewelry, beads, toys, crockery, carpet, glass mirror, wire, plastic, hardware and kitchen findings — anything that catches my eye.”

She integrates art into her Oriental medicine practice and sees a real connection between creativity, health and well-being.

“My art is called ‘Soul Art’ because for me it is a form of meditation that brings me closer to the natural movement of creation,” said Soleil.

The artwork, which ranges from two to three dimensions, is thought-provoking and speaks to the human connection to nature, family and the unconscious.

“I believe it is time, for our well-being and our sanity, to choose to reconnect with the freedom and magic of self-expression,” she said.

Soleil left her home in France at the age of 17 to travel the world and eventually became a doctor of Oriental Medicine after graduating from the Institute of Oriental Medicine in China in 1988. Twelve years ago, she left a successful practice in California to come to Hawaii, where she has a practice.

Her art reflects much of her philosophy and experience, with each piece presenting special message. “The Guardian” is an all silver display with Buddha placed on a platform with a silver panther stretched out looking back at the Buddha with intense yellow eyes.

“I had a dream of my animal spirit being a black panther and it just happened to appear. Call it angel, totem, aumakua, ancestor, we all have divine guidance from the guardian,” shared Soleil.

The process of her artwork is a way of letting the unconscious flow without the interference of the mind, which is often full of doubts and fear. One piece, called “Shine on Me,” is a dazzling sun with a mirror at its center and golden rays of varying shapes and textures radiating out. “Even when hidden by clouds of doubt or fear, turn your face and heart to the sun, receive the light of the world,” is Soleil’s message.

“Choice” shows the consequences of both the negative and positive choices made. A three-dimensional piece, one side shows the destruction of poor human choices and the other side the green lush beauty of positive choices.

“This is a statement piece and it’s very dear to my heart. What are we choosing? Clean water, green or pollution,” Soleil explained, pointing to a ravaged landscape.

At the April 22 opening reception, Soleil also provided information on sustainability practices paired with possible environmental solutions.

“Walking Tall,” an Escher-like metal sculpture picturing four high heels in profile covered in faux fur fabric, speaks to the process of finding one’s way.

“I walk my talk, grounded in the present moment and the path unfolds before me,” is Soleil’s message here. “This is the first time I’ve worked with metal. Most of it was here, but I had to heat it and bend it into different shapes,” she said.

Another piece, “New Story,” is a square frame with rows of loops of varying size and shape. It symbolizes the process of recognizing recurring patterns as a way to make positive changes in one’s life.

“When the pattern emerges ‘over and over,’ it’s time to recognize and choose again, letting go of the old for new growth and maturity,” explained Soleil.

Info: Call 889-0404, extension 101

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